Archive for June 2002

Postnuke Loses lead developer!

From: Steve MacGregor
Save Address
Print View
Show Headers
Report Junk Mail
Date: Sat Jun 22 00:57:56 2002
To:
Subject: PostNuke Mourns Loss of Lead Developer

Greg Allan a.k.a. Adam_Baum, the lead core developer and one of the four
founding members of the PostNuke CMS Development Project passed away from
injuries sustained in a motorcycle accident. The accident occurred June 16,
2002 near his home in Meaford, Ontario in Canada.

Greg Allan was a humble and personable man who always downplayed his
considerable skills. He was a self-taught coder who contributed to every
aspect of development from cleaning up other people’s code to writing new and
innovative software.

Greg was an invaluable asset to the PostNuke development team, and a dear and
trusted friend and co-worker to people on every continent. Through this first
year of PostNuke’s existence, Greg’s personable and giving nature has been a
guiding light and inspiration to many people and projects that have shaped the
development landscape and social personality of the PostNuke project.

Surviving Greg are his parents, Bob and Leone Allan, his brother Brian, his
girlfriend Kim along with her two children Kristin and Kassandra, his dog
Chevy, and trusted friends Dean and Natasha.

In memory of Greg and out of respect for all those mourning his passing, all
PostNuke development and official support activity has been suspended for one
week. We urge all those using PostNuke to post a copy of this article on each
of your PostNuke-Powered sites to commemorate the memory and accomplishments
of Adam_Baum. Please refer your condolences and comments to the memorial
article on postnuke.com.

For funeral arrangements, flower delivery information and memorial
contributions, please email steve@grape.dyndns.org.

On behalf of the PostNuke Development Team,

Steve MacGregor (grape)

Support Operations Manager

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Illustrating abstract concepts – Programming

I’m starting to form this idea in my head about how to illustrate some of the unbelievably abstract ideas I use every day I code at work… and I’m not even doing anything crazy, just grabbing data out of a database, putting the results into an array, and paring out the pieces of the array back into variables. As far as I can tell, this is standard web programming stuff.

I have this idea about the shape of arrays … they’re a combination of a hollowed out candy corn shaped, interlocking like a bicycle chain, half motorized spicerack, half motorized tie rack. A query gets plugged into the computer, and the data comes marching out, like the folding origami geodesic sidekick from Tron, and then files into instantly “rezzing” candycorns, and then I see lots of moving gears and random bits flying around… I suppose my vision’s very Tron looking. Visually speaking, i think it’s a good motif for describing complex computing problems and solutions… or even just showing processes… things rez in when needed, and derez when they’re done…

now If I only had the time to model some things and learn more about animation in 3dsmax…(sigh)

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

elegance & humility

Hmm, it’s interesting programming for places where they don’t understand wtf you’re doing. What I find most frustrating is that I’ve realized the most elegant code is the stuff that usually never gets seen… and is completely lost on people who don’t understand how things work.

sigh…

Oh, and the other thing I just noticed is that every time I run into a roadblock when coding something, as soon as I start asking for help, thereby conceding to my inability to solve the task at hand, the answer comes to me. Is that a function of emailing someone my problem, and thinking about it from the standpoint of having to ask someone to help me figure it out? Hmm, probably.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter